Unconventional Arabic Language Resources, Vol. 1

1950s DLI students sit riveted by another mind-blowing Arabic lesson.

In the military, within the language analyst community (government speak for ‘translator’), there is a phrase that sends shivers down the spines of most service-members. The phrase is… “language maintenance.” It makes the language retention process sound as interesting and thrilling as changing a car’s oil, which is probably why most military “language maintenance” materials are so damned boring. From my experience, most materials consisted of either a written article from Al Jazeera or BBC Arabic, or a 2-3 minute audio passage from the same sources. Bilateral trade agreements! Weather reports! The Joy! Now, these sorts of materials are certainly important – especially since the DLPT draws almost exclusively from them – but they can become stale very quickly, especially at the higher levels. It’s also understandable that since the personnel tasked with putting together materials for language maintenance are swamped with a million other tasks, they naturally reach for the same resources time and again. In that regards, I thought I’d list a few places where you can find Arabic Language materials that are both authentic and engaging.

Disclaimer: I like Arabic, but I love Iraq and Iraqi Arabic. As such, you’ll probably notice a certain bias towards materials related to Iraq. You just got to deal with it, yo. Also, most of these materials are probably in the 2+ and higher range of the ILR scale. If you aren’t there yet, you might not get as much out of these.

1. The Harmony Program Documents from West Point’s Countering Terrorism Center
These documents are probably some of the most unique documents of their kind on the internet. Documents captured from insurgents and terrorists across Iraq and Afghanistan were made available by the US Military to researchers at West Point’s CTC under the agreement that they were allowed to be publicly published. It doesn’t get more “real” than this. Want to read the letter that al-Qa’ida’s second in command, Ayman al-Zawahiri, sent to the former leader of al-Qa’ida in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi? What about the form that al-Qa’ida required its soldiers to fill out if they were quitting jihad in Iraq? There are tons of different documents that you can pore over; all of them interesting and historical. The best part of all, however, is that every single Arabic Language document has an English translation accessible by clicking the “View English Translation” button in the upper right corner of the page. It not only provides a word-for-word translation, but adds context and background history on the who/what/where/when/why of each document. You almost don’t need your trusty Hans Wehr!

2. Baghdad TED Talks
Yeah, you read that right. Official TED talks… in Arabic… from Baghdad. This is actually very, very recent (last week). The footage isn’t actually up on the official site just yet, but you can still watch a replay of the livestream here.

3. Iraqiyah Confessions
These are pretty wild; there isn’t really any correlation to this practice on mainstream American TV. Basically, some of the most “infamous” of Iraqi terrorists and insurgents that are rounded up by US/Iraqi Forces are brought on TV for dramatic one-on-one mea culpas where they detail their sordid jihadi ways. One of the lengthiest interviews is one done with Munaf al-Rawi, the so-called “Wali of Baghdad,” who led al-Qa’ida in Iraq’s Baghdad operations and who was captured back in 2010 and sentenced to death this March. The entire interview can be found conveniently pieced together on my youtube playlist. There’s plenty more out there. I should note, some people might find it repulsive to dedicate 30-40 minutes listening to a terrorist talk, but I think most people will see the value. Maybe I’ll post a transcript some day for the non-Arab speaking folks out there?

4. al-Jazeera Sports
I have a theory that sometimes the best thing to do on certain days is just put on some Arabic in the background and let your mind absorb and work with the Arabic passively. Don’t worry about looking up words, don’t mess with trying to understand everything, just get in that messy stream of Arabic and let it wash over you like a warm shower. That’s right. And, in my opinion, the best way to do that is to put al-Jazeera Sports on. They generally have soccer (football lol) on at some point during the day and it’s super easy to just pull it up and watch some soccer for 30 minutes. This method is even more beneficial if you follow American sports, as a lot of the chatter between broadcasters is the same so it is fairly easy to figure out what they are chatting about after a while. al-Jazeera Sports streams live from this website. Enjoy!

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Al Jazeera: Yemeni scholars decide to call for Jihad against any invasion

http://aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/F1240DD1-BCE9-4066-BEA7-58C2B2375C99.htm

'Abd al-Majid al-Zindani, one of the most prominent scholars who signed the report.

Yemeni (religious) scholars said today that they would call for jihad in the event Yemen was subjected to any military incursion or foreign invasion.

A report, signed by 150 Yemeni scholars of which the most prominent was ‘Abd al-Majid al-Zindani, indicated that, “Jihad will become obligatory for all Muslims if Yemen is subjected to any aggression or foreign invasion.”

The report, which was read out loud for journalists by Member of Parliament Shaykh ‘Arif al-Subri, included the opposition of Yemen’s scholars to any foreign presence, and any Yemeni military cooperation or agreement with foreign elements.

The report sought the support of the rulers of the Islamic Umma'(nation of believers), those governed (by Islamic law), scholars, groups, and organizations, to, “Support their brothers in Yemen, and stand as one front against the foreign conspiracies and interference.”

He indicated that the scholars who signed the report represent all different areas of the country; the most prominent of them being al-Zindani who is wanted by Washington who accuses him of sponsoring what they call “terrorism”.

al-Zindani has already intensely opposed the international conference on Yemen that will be held in two weeks in London, and has called for the sons of Yemen to pay attention before a guardianship is placed upon them.

Baiting (America)

These developments come in light of recurring media reports about the possibility of the American war against al-Qa’ida being extended to Yemeni soil.

Joseph Lieberman, a member of the US Senate, has already said that America must follow it’s enemies to new battlefields in Yemen and elsewhere.

On the other hand, the British newspaper “The Independent” said in an editorial that the al-Qa’ida organization seeks to lure the United States into Yemen where it has ease of movement in it’s mountains, especially in light of the weak government.

NFTR//
DMD

Al Jazeera: News Summary, 14 January, 2010

(Intro Music)

(00:11) Greetings.

(00:12) The American Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, expects the number of victims from the earthquake in Haiti will be extremely high, similar to the aftermath of the tsunami that struck the Indian Ocean in 2004, killing 230,000 people. Clinton’s statements came a few hours after the Haitian President expressed his fear that the number killed in the earthquake that struck his country could be in the hundreds of thousands.

(00:41) Qatar has announced that it’s sending humanitarian aid to Haiti. An airplane took off from Doha International Airport transporting medicine, medical and first-aid supplies, as well as food supplies.

(00:53) The Afghan Police said that 15 civilians and a police officer were killed by an explosion in an overcrowded market in the Rosghan region, south of Kabul.

(01:07) An al-Jazeera correspondent in Islamabad relates from a military source that 18 people were killed and 14 others injured by UAV drone strike on a gathering in Waziristan believed to have been carried out by American (forces). It is not clear yet whether or not the Taliban leader in Pakistan, Hakim Allah Mahsud, was killed or injured in (the strike), or if he escaped the area before the attack.

(01:35) Thousands of Iranians participated in the funeral of the nuclear scientist, Mas’ud ‘Ali al-Muhammadi, who was assassinated last Tuesday by a bomb hidden in a motorcycle near his residence in northern Tehran.

(01:51) Religious scholars in Yemen have established a call to jihad in the event the country is subjected to what they describe as an aggressor or invasion. They announced their rejection of any security or military interference (in Yemen), as well as the establishment of any (foreign) bases on Yemeni soil or it’s regional waters.

(02:09) Until next time…

(Exit Music)

NFTR//
DMD